About mwsasse

2014-07-14 20.03.18Hello everyone.  My mwsasse website is meant to establish creative connections with other writers, producers, and lovers of good storytelling.

I’ll be writing about writing, publishing, history, culture, and life. I’d love to hear your thoughts as well!

I jumped into the indie author life in December 2012 when I published my first novel, “Beauty Rising”. Since then I have published my second novel, The Recluse Storyteller, in October 2013, and I released my third novel, The Reach of the Banyan Tree, in June of 2014. I published my first Christmas story, If Love is a Crime, in December 2014, and my fourth novel, A Love Story for a Nation, is set for a mid-2015 release. My fifth novel is well underway and should be arriving by the end of 2015.

A little about myself: I’ve spent most of the last two decades living overseas in Vietnam and Malaysia.  I’m currently living in Penang, enjoying the tropical weather and the creative writing energy this setting provides.

Besides writing novels, I’m also bonkers about drama and musical theatre. I love writing 2014-05-28 18.03.22plays and have written and produced more than 10 full-length productions. I’m especially in love with the short play format and have written nearly 40 short plays over the last few years. They are on average about 10 minutes long. I’ve even won a couple awards for those.

  • 2013 Best Script Award for my play “No, in Spite of Itself.” (penangpac Short & Sweet Festival
  • 2014 Best Script Award for my play “A Pinch of Fate, A Shot of Destiny” (penangpac Short & Sweet Festival)

“A Pinch of Fate” is also being featured in the Sydney Short & Sweet Festival in February 2015.

I’d love to connect with you about writing, producing, and any other related fields.

Mark W Sasse

Email: mark@mwsasse.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/markwsasse (HERE!)2014-09-16 14.25.20

Twitter: @sassevn

Amazon Author Page: Mark Sasse Amazon Author Page

(Right: My Malaysian writing paradise.)

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Recent Posts

Plotting or Plodding?

Humph! Here’s the real truth about writers: sometimes we have no idea how it’s all going to turn out.

I mean, really, what are we doing? What am I doing? What is my plot doing?

Sometimes it feels like I’m playing a giant connect-the-dots while blindfolded. Are these two dots really going to connect in the end?

This is an issue with any type of writing – including a stand-alone novel. But with a series, humph! Plotting seems like plodding at an ant’s pace.

I’m working on the final segment of The Forgotten Child Trilogy, and while I’m currently on chapter 19 – more than half way finished, I am starting to wonder how I’m going to tie up all of these strands. Yes, I like strands. Perhaps too much. Maybe I should have stuck with the third person limited. I did that once with the novel A Love Story For a Nation and I must admit it was freeing because every scene whether description or dialogue came from one person’s perspective. That’s why books which in the first person “I” have such an appeal.  It’s immediate. It’s personal. But let’s admit it. It’s also limiting.

My first series is being written in third person omniscient. It has to be this way because there are so many characters who are helping to tell the story. Now, I don’t write the narration from everyone’s perspective. In fact, there are three (maybe four) antagonists and I don’t tell it from their perspective at all. It’s just a choice I’ve made in this particular series. I wanted their motivations to be slightly obscured through the perspective of the different protagonists. Yes, this story is about many people.

There’s the rub. It can be confusing because I’m trying to balance many different strands from many different perspectives: Frick, Bee, Ash, Hatty, Ruthy, Rachany, Haddock, Adams & O’Malley – any more?

Okay, so what’s the solution? How to keep my head on straight?

First, take a deep breath and know that no one else – I mean no one – will ever see your first draft. So it’s okay if it’s terrible, and it usually is.  Just get the story down the best you can. You may not fill all holes at once and that’s okay.

Second, plan on spending the next six months doing rewrites and revisions. Just do it. Build in the time into your writing schedule. You’ll be amazed at how your mind will shift and you’ll get new ideas – better ideas – over time. Don’t be in a rush to get it done. Take your time.

Third, remember that it will work out in the end. It always does. The ‘i’s will be dotted the the ‘t’s crossed. It just takes time. It may seem chaotic right now, but after you write that next chapter, some clarity will come. More direction will be revealed and you’ll get there.

Four, remember to tie up all the ends even if it means re-writing. Don’t leave anything hanging when you come to the end of the series. Therefore, read the whole thing again. I know, I know. You told yourself that you’d rather bang your head against the wall than read your story one more time. But it will be worth it. Slow down. Read it again. Make sure it’s all tied up neatly in the end.

A good last impression is the best impression. Don’t let the end slip away from you.

Okay, now I need to start following my own advice.

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