My First 15 Months as an Indie Author

Honestly, it feels like I’ve been “out there” as an author for 15 years. Has it really been only 15 months?

A simple check of the math will attest to the fact that, yes, indeed I released my first novel 15 months ago in December 2012. So much has happened since then that I have trouble thinking about what it actually means to be “out there”. But I’ve learned a lot and I’m excited to see where I’ll be after 30 months. For the meantime, let me ponder a few things I can now say with some certainty.

1. I love being an indie author. Sure it would be great to be able to write for a living, but I don’t regret at all everything I get to be involved with as an Indie author. I am completely free to write when I want, publish when I want, promote when I want, and hide myself in a corner when I want.  I love picking my own book covers, finding my own editors, interacting with book bloggers and reviewers, and just daily navigating blindly the new world of publishing. It’s darn-right exciting.

2. I’ve learned that being an indie author is extremely time consuming. There is never an awkward pause where I wonder what I should do now. Granted, sometimes I pause because I am slightly overwhelmed by the many tasks I need to do but don’t know how to find time to accomplish.

3. I’ve also learned to keep life and expectations as simple as possible. I’ll have an occasional promotion weekend when I’ll go gang-busters over contacting an insane amount of people concerning a variety of promotions or reviews. After than, I might not contact anyone for a while as I concentrate on writing, editing, revising, and just plain-old life.

4. Don’t let the highs be too high or the lows be too low. I always have great expectations. I believe in my writing and I believe one day it will find a wider audience. In the meantime, I greatly appreciate every kind word and positive review, but I try not to get too carried away by any one positive word at a time. Likewise, when a bad review rolls in, I try to think about it in a level-headed manner. I try to learn from it, but ultimately try not to think about it too much. Roll with the punches and move forward.

5. I’ve learned to enjoy blogging. I honestly had no idea what to blog about when I started sometime back in 2012. But with everything else, I’ve just learned to be myself. Write about whatever comes to my mind. The last thing I want to do is try to be a pretentious blogger. That’s not me. I hope that comes through on my blog. That’s probably also the reason that I am a reluctant and awkward tweeter. I can’t figure out what the heck Twitter is good for, and I’m sure it shows!

6. More than anything else, I’ve realized that I’m in this, this indie author thing, for the long haul. I’ve never felt more complete or purposeful with my life than when I am writing. It feels like I have found my calling and I’m going to keep churning out my ideas as long as they exist.

So when 15 months turns into 15 years, I hope to look back on this post and more clearly understand where I came from.

This is an amazing time to be an indie author. I feel like the luckiest guy in the world. I have a laptop. I have time. I have ideas. What more could I want?

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2 thoughts on “My First 15 Months as an Indie Author

  1. “More than anything else, I’ve realized that I’m in this, this indie author thing, for the long haul. I’ve never felt more complete or purposeful with my life than when I am writing. It feels like I have found my calling and I’m going to keep churning out my ideas as long as they exist.”

    That’s the place I am getting to. I make some money from writing. I’d like to make an entire living from it. But I know that if I was told up front I’d never make another penny, I’d still write just as much. And how many people can say that about their jobs?

    • I absolutely agree. I didn’t know what I was doing when I released my first novel, but the whole process made me realize that I just love to write. It’s a good place to be at.

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