A Railroad Trail

Three hundred yards behind the house where I grew up was a railroad track. Now its a beautiful bike trail.

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The railroad tracks provided an important hub of activity of my childhood. It was a small, rather insignificant line which traveled from Butler PA to Freeport and beyond, but as a young boy, it was as if Commodore Vanderbilt himself had named this line the most important one in the world. The rambunctious young country kids would hang out at the tracks, putting our ear on the steel rails as we tried to listen for the vibration from an oncoming locomotive. I always felt like a Cheerokee warrior when I did that, trying to hear the rumbling of the cowboy posse coming my way. When it did arrive, we would stand on the side banks signaling for the engine to blow its whistle and throwing stones at the freight cars. The best part, however, was when the caboose arrived, we would yell and scream and, invariably, an engineer would poke his head out of the back and throw us candy. Yeah, it was the greatest thing in the world. And it kept getting better.

One summer we heard that Conrail had purchased our tracks. I had no idea what that meant only that Conrail was, at the time, the largest railroad company in the world. That proved the importance of my little track. The largest company in the world ran freight behind my house. I spent hours there. Picking berries along the route. Putting pennies on the track to be amazed at how the train flattened them into smooth oval metal charms. I would use the rails as balancing beams and see how far I could walk on them without touching down. There were certain parts of the tracks which entered the “cliff” sections. We always joshed with each other about how not to get caught in these sections when the train approached or we would have to cling on the rocks hoping the train wouldn’t ever suck us under its weight. It was a real fear of mine. Of course, nothing so dramatic ever happened, but the perceived danger heightened the wonderfulness of it all. Here’s one of those “cliffs”. Yeah, I’m pretty sure I could have figured something out.

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After I went off to college, the line eventually shut down. Years later the tracks were removed and the community was in an uproar as to what would happen to the railroad land. Of course land owners who buttressed up against the tracks wanted it to revert to them. But the community leaders had different plans and they went about creating a bicycling trail. There were lawsuits and many obstacles along the way, but what they have created is a beautiful long bike trail through the charming and beautiful Pennsylvania countryside. Someone got this one right. Now this narrow strip of land is creating new memories for families and kids which will last for another generation.

There’s nothing quite as awesome as a railroad. But a bike trail isn’t a far off second.

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The trees in the background hide the elevated railroad tracks/trail which were built to cut the valley in two.
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A view from the trail. That’s my childhood house nestled between the branches.

 

 

 

 

Visiting the Hudson River Valley

New York City is one of the most attractive tourist destinations in the world. With broadway, stunning museums, a diverse food scene, and fascinating historical and cultural sites at every turn, New York is a must-experience destination.

However, how many people experience the beautiful, lush Hudson River Valley just north of the city? If you haven’t, it’s a must.

My alma mater is in the beautiful and quaint village of Nyack, just 18 miles north of the city where the river widens spreads out like a shimmering lake sided by rolling forested hills. It’s breathtakingly beautiful. Here’s a view of the region from my former dormitory:

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Nyack is a quaint town which is lined with wonderful restaurants, antique shops, and two of the best authentic NY pizza joints anywhere!

Right across the river from Nyack is Tarrytown, home of Sleepy Hollow, the inspiration of Washington Irving’s “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.” Other must visit sites in the Hudson Valley Region include FDR’s home, the Vanderbilt Mansion, and, of course, West Point.

So the next time you are in the city, head north for a day and experience the beautiful Hudson River Valley.