First Jaunt to Egypt

I had a great time taking a few days to explore Cairo. I wasn’t sure what to expect except spectacular pyramids. They did not disappoint. The Giza pyramids sitting on the edge of the desert were indeed awe-inspiring trying to figure out and imagine what it looked like when they were being built.  The desert was beautiful and the requisite camel ride was thrilling if not a little nerve-wracking.  Those are tall animals. I felt small.

Cairo itself is a chaotic mish-mash of traffic, sounds, sites, smells, and endless people angling for a dollar or two. It’s understandable. They’ve been through a lot and ever one of the twenty-two million citizens of Cairo are competing for a limited economic pie.

Security remains tight and there was no place tighter than in Coptic Cairo – the old section with a myriad of beautiful Coptic churches.

We pre-booked our itinerary through WEKNOWEGYPT.com which I highly recommend if you are ever going. No haggle, fair prices. Dependable drivers and a terrific guide to the Egypt Antiquities Museum. We learned a lot without be overwhelmed and man-handled by an over-zealous guide.  Here are a few of my favorite shots from my trip.

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Night View from Our Balcony

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Coptic Cairo

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Approaching on foot

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The Desert

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The Cologne Cathedral & My Latest Novel: An Excerpt

Part 3 of the Forgotten Child Trilogy, releasing March 20th, begins like this:

***

She cowered in the shadows of the ambulatory, tucked behind the ribbed lines of a granite pillar. Her boy lay limp in her arms, his eyes closed, his breathing shallow and punctuated by an occasional whimper as her soft pats and solemn tones tried to revive the spark within him. Patches of black skin blotted his face, hidden under a blanket wound around him. Voices echoed from the aisle and, with haste, she picked up a bronze basin filled with black ash.
“Lord, I repent. We repent,” she repeated in her native German tongue.
She lifted the edge of the blanket from the boy’s face, exposing him to the chill of the cathedral.

***

The cathedral referred to in the opening scene is the Cologne Cathedral, on the Rhine River in northwestern Germany. I visited it with my family back in 2014, and it made such an impression that it ended up being a location in my newest novel. Here’s a few photos I took of my visit:

It’s spectacular and awe-inspiring. The cathedral even made it onto the cover of the A PARTING IN THE SKY:

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Yep, there it is with Francis Frick standing off to the left staring into the sea. The cathedral becomes the backdrop to the backstory of the trilogy. It exposes the origins of the warrior Ash and his relationship with Zette.  Here’s another excerpt from chapter 1.

***

“Ambros, I love you.” She kissed him, blackness and all, disease and all. She kissed him and placed the child in swaddling clothes on the edge of the ornate shrine of the relics of the Magi—the remains of the wise men who had once traveled to Bethlehem to visit a different child, but which now resided in the cloistered sanctum of the Cologne cathedral.
“Please. Take my Ambros.” She lifted her face towards the priests. “I’m sorry. I’m sorry.”
She turned and ran the opposite direction under the arched vault, past the chapel, and down the side aisle.
“Black death!” the priests repeated as they pointed at the child. “Black death! The plague is in the cathedral.”
The child breathed his last. He had no more whimpers—no more carnal cries for help. His body had fought all it could.
The gifts of the Magi were different for this child. No one bestowed him with gold, frankincense, or myrrh—only cursed looks from the contingent of priests who bemoaned the black death defiling the sacred house of God. They scurried out of the ambulatory and called for the bishop to expel the disease from their presence. A lone child lay in the company of the remains of the Magi. There was, however, one more in the child’s presence.

***

Christian tradition holds that the remains – relics as they call them – of the Magi, the travelers from the east who visited the young baby Jesus, were brought to the Cologne Cathedral where they remain to this day. It was an interesting and unexpected twist which I enjoyed weaving into the novel.  This scene takes place in A.D. 1347 as the black plague grips Europe.

I really enjoy using my experiences around the world in my writing, and it’s my wish that the reader will enjoy them too.

A PARTING IN THE SKY – Part Three of the Forgotten Child Trilogy releases on Kindle & Paperback on March 20, 2019.

PRE-ORDER a parting in the sky HERE

One final Excerpt:

***

Death has a way of bolstering doubt and diminishing purpose. The bustling town of Cologne, on the mighty Rhine River, had closed its inner soul to the stench of the plague. The people toiled as a hopeless lot against the unstoppable power of the grave. That may have played a part in why she felt an unmistakable stirring within her. That, and the absurdity of the scene in the cathedral. Ashes poured over a child’s head. The high-brow barking of the priests. The presence of the bones of the long-dead Magi. But in the end, it was the lone child, unable to muster a sound, falling out of life with each breath as his mother ran in anguish the other way that made the watcher see the uselessness of it all.

***

Thanks for all of your support!

The Library of Siena Cathedral

This summer I had my first ever trip to Italy – 14 incredible days of culture, history, and food. I thought I’d share a few highlights from time to time on the old blog.

On our tour of ancient capital of Siena, the magnificent cathedral impressed for architecture and art. What else is new? It’s Italy, after all. Here’s a few shots of what we experienced at the cathedral.

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The Cathedral – opened in early 13th century

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The unique striped design inside the main hall of the cathedral.

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Floor design in main cathedral

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Yes, a famous sculpture.

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Choir book. So cool!

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The vibrant ceiling of the library.

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These library frescoes are original. Never restored. The vibrant colors over seven hundred years old were amazing.

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The library! These ancient choir books were too amazing to pass up. Anyone up for singing?

PNC Park, Pittsburgh, PA – From the top of the Rotunda

Here’s one of my favorite not Italian spots in the world – PNC Park. It has, of course, been lauded over and over as a modern baseball marvel. One of the truly outstanding features of this stadium is the navy steel rotunda which forms a spiral walkway to the very top  of the ballpark. I’ve been meaning to post these since June, so now as the baseball season begins to wane, and I go into mourning, I thought I’d show you what Pittsburgh looks like from the top of the rotunda of the greatest baseball stadium in the world. Here goes:

 

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Legacy Square commemorating the great Negro League teams from Pittsburgh. There used to be bronze statues here. Where did they go?

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Looking straight down on the enormous statue of the great Hall of Famer Willie Stargell – one of my childhood heroes. He died the night before PNC opened its doors in 2001.

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Here’s the top of the rotunda itself. The original designs had a roof over the steel structure, but I’m so glad that didn’t happen.

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Standing at the top of the left field foul pole – fans filing in.

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Looking eastward over the Allegheny River. The tallest building in Pittsburgh – the former US Steel building takes center stage. 

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Looking Southeast over the Allegheny. PPG Paints building second from the left. In the distance Point State Park and Mount Washington.

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A beautiful view of the Roberto Clemente Bridge heading downtown.

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In my happy place.  See you next summer PNC Park.

I’ve Been Hiding in Italy on Vacation

My poor blog. It has lost the fight against ancient relics and priceless cuisine. I’ve been on the most amazing tour of Italy the last week plus that I forgot there was a world out there I used to know. Way to much to show and tell on this one little post, but I thought I’d drop a few photos to show what I did just yesterday. Lots more to come. Consider this the primo.

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Magic Square in Pisa. Okay. Too many people diss Pisa. I’ve heard them say there are so many other places to go. Skip Pisa. Well, no. Magic Square as they call it is rather magical. Of course the leaning tower gets all the glory, but the cathedral and baptistry (foreground) are stunning. Absolutely gorgeous. Well worth a trip from Florence.

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Look at this. Stunning, isn’t it? This is the library ceiling from the Siena Cathedral. This is just the ceiling. Original fresco never restored. You are looking at the colors as they were applied back in the 13th century. Stunning. My old church had a library, but I think it had a matte-white Sherwin-Williams finish. Not quite the same thing.

2018-08-02 12.35.06Tuscan country side. So beautiful. This is actually a view from a restaurant where we had lunch. If you look way in the distance, you can see San Gimignano – the so-called “Manhattan of the Middle Ages.” See below.

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Here’s the square in San Gimignano. There are many of these towers which are visible from far off – making a stunning medieval city on a hill. This town was one of my absolute favorites. A must see surrounded by the incredible Tuscan countryside – grapes, olive trees, lavender, etc…

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That’s what I’ve been up to. Oh, and tomorrow I go to Venice. Last week I was in Rome. Yes, I am spoiled beyond belief. I’ll get back to writing one of these days.  I hope you are enjoying your summer as much as I’m enjoying mine.

Checking in from Ireland

I’ve been in Killeagh, Ireland at Greywood Arts for a little more than two days now so I wanted to check in with everyone concerning how’s everything going. Well, in a word, great!

Greywood is a terrific venue for the arts. A renovated (and still being renovated) 18th century Georgian house specifically for promoting the arts. Here’s my amazing writing room.

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It overlooks the Dissour River, more of a stream in my mind, but has a beautiful view of  a small cascade right from the desk. I even saw a river otter! It is bright, cheery, and quiet. A perfect combination for creativity. How’s it been working? Amazingly well. On day one, I completed a play called “Embrace” which I started nearly five years ago and wondered if I would ever finish it. Well, I did. Seven hours of hard labor on that script completely revitalized it and I’m very happy with it. Unlike anything I have ever written.

Today, day two,  was spent working on a play called “For the Glory of Nat Turner.” I had started it last year with a mere 2000+ words and I hammered out the entire first act, clocking the whole thing in at around 7000 words now. Tomorrow, I’d love to finish this one too! Amazing productivity.

The village of Killeagh is small and quaint. No more than 500 souls live here. Here are a few shots.

The weather today turned toward the nasty. Really cold and rainy. No walks and very little out and about. The forecast isn’t great, but I hope it clears a little tomorrow cause I was going to take the bus over to the seaside town of Youghal only 10 minutes away. We shall see how it looks in the morning.

I’m also hoping to take a trip into Cork for a day and check out the city. That will likely be the extent of my touring since my main focus is on writing, writing, and writing.

This is such a terrific opportunity. So relaxing and rewarding and I can’t think Greywood enough for their hospitality.

Let’s get back at it!

Out of the Bubble

I currently live in Saudi Arabia, and as an expat, it’s easy to find yourself living in comfortable bubble. My life in Jeddah feels that way in many respects. My main existence is a combination of apartment living on a compound, busing to school and back, all day at an American school that looks and feels like an American school, and then excursions to restaurants where most of the wait staff is from the Philippines. It’s not difficult to forget where it is I live.

Just for an evening, we decided to stroll the new corniche area of Jeddah, which buttresses up against the Red Sea. It was a Friday evening, and people were out and about EVERYWHERE! This is a beautiful and large new water front development complete with public beaches in the pristine water, children’s play parks, outdoor sculptures, and a terrific bike and walking path right in between the Corniche Road. But while here, I was unmistakably reminded of where I live.  Uncountable Saudi families brought their carpets and spread them out on the grassy areas to enjoy the evening air. Boys played soccer, while ladies in abayas and hijabs chatted in groups and strolled slowly through plethora of sidewalks. Children and a few men splashed in the water.

It’s good to get out of one’s bubble from time to time. You get to feel the flow of the culture. You get to question things you thought you understood, and you get a feel for the local people whom you don’t actually meet too often.

It was a pleasant evening strolling by the Red Sea. Here are a few photos.