What is Writing Success?

When does a writer know when he or she is successful?

Being “a writer” has certain connotations and sometimes embedded tangible requirements. Does he make a living from writing? Is her work critically acclaimed? Is he well-known? Does she garner respect from other writers? Do other people ask him to write? Is her author rank on Amazon within the top few thousand? Can a book release produce excitement? Does she have book signings? Has he won awards for his craft? Does she work tirelessly to improve?

Surely, these are all requirements of being a ‘real’ writer.

But, alas, no, that’s not it. It’s much simpler. It’s more personal. It’s more subjective.

Being a writer is about having the confidence within where one feels they know what they are doing but remain wise enough to know how foolish a thought like that is. Despite always wondering if what is written is any good, he or she keeps on writing.

For the first 30+ years of my life, I had the heart of a writer, yet I was not one. I was a person who made excuses about my writing, which mainly never occurred. I focused on my weaknesses and the strengths of the real professional writers. Strangely enough, the gap between my weaknesses as a writer and a highly respected writer’s strength was vast. That’s what I was focusing on, and it made writing seem like an impossible task. There was a gulf of separation too wide, so I  figured I might as well not try.

I’m ten years beyond that type of foolish thinking. Do I still have writing weaknesses? Oh yes. I think I’ve even discovered more that I didn’t know existed. But now, I don’t look at the big guys in awe and lament that I will never be like them. I have learned to feel comfortable in my own shoes. I have unique experiences and unique bouts of creativity which are vastly different from others.  I have something to say, and that’s enough.

Sure, I like a good review or an award or honor just like the next writer. It certainly can stroke a writer’s ego and boost one’s confidence.

But good reviews or awards or a certain threshold of downloads does not a writer make.

A writer is simply someone bold enough to admit that he or she is one.

Once you can overcome that hurdle, you can be successful, and you can write in peace.


Gearing Up for Greywood Arts Residency in Ireland

I’ve found myself virtually walking main street of Killeagh, Ireland using Google Maps Street View, trying to imagine what it will be like to stroll down it in person. I won’t have to wait too long. That makes me so excited!

Through a submission of my play “The Last Bastion,” Greywood Arts – an arts residency house in Killeagh – awarded me with the Greywood Arts Winter Residency 2018 for playwriting. My reward is a one-week stint at their place to do one thing – write. Yes, it’s kind of like a dream come true. I’ll have my own room plus a writing room overlooking the Dissour River.  Right across the river is the Old Thatch Pub – a family establishment for 300 years – one of the oldest in Ireland, and I’m getting the feeling I’m going to be surrounded by Irish quaintness.

The strangest thing I’ll have to adjust to is my reasoning for being there – writing. I’ve never had a week, let a lone a day, when my only responsibility was writing. I have no other pressures, distractions, or responsibilities. Simply writing. Doesn’t that sound like bliss?

Oh, and I have a reading. Here. Look:


I’ll get to present excerpts of what I’ve worked on that week with the local arts community. I’ve been told there may even be some local actors willing to help me out with the reading. How cool would that be?

What will I be working on? I have a lot.  I have two full-length plays I’ve started but have not finished. I’d love to knock them out this week. One is a historical play related to the Nat Turner slave uprising in 1831. The other is a social commentary piece highlighting the conflict between the conservative Christian church in America and the issue of gay marriage.  Third, I am mostly finished with my brand new ensemble show “Crazy Love,” so I’d like to polish off those 8 short plays which comprise it. Other ideas include an embellished play of my childhood which walks through small town America in different time periods of the 20th century.  Oh, and knowing me, a new idea will pop in my brain and perhaps supersede all of these. Who’s to say?

Anyways, I head out for Greywood Arts on March 30.  I will certainly be posting photos and highlights of this week. Stay tuned.


My biggest promotion yet, for my biggest story ever!

Get your FREE copy of A MAN TOO OLD FOR A PLACE TOO FAR (The Forgotten Child Trilogy Book 1) through March 12.  (regular price $3.99)

With book two on the near horizon and book three in the pipeline,  I want to get this one into as many reader’s hands as possible. It’s a story I believe in. I hope you will too!


Author Dolores Ayotte calls it ” 5 STARS … fact, fiction, and fairy tale at its best.”

The Story:

A Man Too Old for a Place Too Far is part one of The Forgotten Child Trilogy—a one-of-a-kind adventure that mixes time travel, magical realism, and historical fiction into a contemporary story about an old man, his estranged daughter, and a tiny flying person in a white robe, who chooses to believe that anything can happen with enough prodding and an endless supply of pomegranates.Forgotten Child Trilogy Book1 FrontCoverFinal




Don’t Underestimate Your Writing

Don’t underestimate your writing.

I learned this lesson recently. It was late December, and the submission window for entering a script in a theatre festival in New York was rapidly approaching. It was a festival that produced one of my plays in 2017 — my first ever production in New York City. It was a big deal to me.

Since I had a modest, one-year history at the festival, I wanted to submit again for the 2018 version. But I ran into an issue. What script? Last year it was an easy decision. It was a script I really liked. It was about issues current in the news. It was timely, funny, and profound at the same time. I thought it was one of my best, so I was delighted when it was chosen.

But for this year, I just felt like I didn’t have a script that was as good as 2017. I hemmed and hawed and eventually decided, on a whim, to send off a script I had written a while back but never did anything with it. I re-polished it and sent it off before the December 31 deadline.

I had no expectations.

Then it happened. Earlier this week I received an email from the theatre in New York saying they loved the script I sent and wanted to produce it for their June festival. I was shocked. They loved the script? They chose the script? I had no idea that it would have been chosen.

After this happened, I read it over with another person, and this person told me how much she liked the script. Suddenly, it was starting to grow on me. A script I thought was just “ok” was really not that bad. I started seeing it for its uniqueness, its quirkiness, its unusual story. It started sounding funny to me as I read it and …

What’s going on?

Suddenly, the simplest of principles once again smacked me in the forehead–everyone has a different perspective. This is not something new. I know this. As a novelist whose novels have been reviewed by many individuals, I know that each person brings their own take and opinions when assessing a creative work. I’ve seen them all–“Brilliant” and “I couldn’t finish it.”

So I learned a lesson: just get the work out there!

It may be liked more than you think. It may have hidden potential that you can’t see. It may also fall flat on its face. But I’d rather have it fall flat on its face than live a digital death on some hard drive.

Guess what I’ve been doing this week? Sending more of my plays and writings to various contests around the world. Nothing may become of any of them. But you never know until you try.

Don’t underestimate your own writing. Put in the time, give it all you got, then release it to the wind and let it float where it may.




Marica from THE BOOK CHICK posted a great review of book 1 of my new trilogy A Man Too Old for a Place Too Far. 

Here’s an excerpt of what she had to say. Please check out the full review at the link below from THE BOOK CHICK.

“I was a little skeptical when I started the book but now I’m happy that I gave it a shot. I’m pleasantly surprised with the book and its story and Sasses unique way of writing. It was refreshing and new …”

“It is an intriguing story and Mr Sasse do (sic) not give the readers much to figure out how it all fits together until the end. The language is easy to read and understand and the book keeps the same flow through and through. All the characters are great and keeps evolving deeper in the story and the whole book just captivates you …”

Check out the full review at THE BOOK CHICK!

AMAZON:  Ebook & Paperback HERE!




In Production: You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

I’m excited to bring this small cast musical to life this April. If you aren’t familiar with it, it’s a terrific Broadway musical which captures the spunky insouciance of  the beloved Charles M. Shultz characters known collectively as Peanuts.

This particular musical, the revised version, focuses on 6 characters: Charlie Brown, Lucy, Sally, Schroeder, Linus, and, of course, Snoopy.

I have a young, exuberant cast I’m working with, and we will put our best foot forward to bring a rousing, fun show to Saudi Arabia.

Of course, behind the scenes, LOTS of work is on the way. I have two production classes totaling 35 students who are hard at work to provide the backdrops and scenes to bring this musical to life.

Here’s a couple photos. Much more to come.


The ladies hard at work creating Lucy’s Psychiatrist Booth. Yes, they’re doing an awesome job!


Schroeder’s Piano Crew. The top of the baby baby grand in the foreground.


And a sneak peak – the first look at our amazing Charlie Brown. He’s standing in front of an unfinished Broadway flat will eventually create the show’s backdrop. Photo shoot next week. More to come!

Another One to Love

Love is not an exhaustible commodity.

We know this because when a new person enters our lives, and we love them, we don’t have to release love’s pressure valve and let out a little love from our opposite end to compensate.

Love is more akin to the expanding universe. It finds new voids and new spaces which weren’t there, and it doesn’t spread thinner and thinner like a tsunami eventually drying up on land. No. Love is as deep at its origin as it is at its point of expansion.

That’s a marvelous thought, isn’t it?

This topic has been on my mind, mainly because today I became a grandfather. My grandson, whom I will not be able to meet for a few more months, is a new and immediate object of my love. He hasn’t done anything to earn my love. He just has it by the virtue of being born to my daughter.

Love is automatic. It’s not coerced. It’s not purchased. It’s there. Just like that, the number of people in the world that I love has expanded by one.

And this got me thinking.

What would the world look like if we all understood this truth about love and acted on love’s expanding principles? What downcast soul would be brightened? What violent act would be stopped? How many broken hearts would be mended?

What would happen if we each expanded our reach of love by one more person outside of our regular sphere of influence?

We would all be richer for it.

This is my first lesson of being a grandfather.