Last Chance to Get “The Reach of the Banyan Tree” for FREE!

For the only time ever, “The Reach of the Banyan Tree” is free on Kindle, but only through December 16.

Get it for FREE here!

This has also been my first time ever on Book Bub. I’ll give some overall analysis of my experience later in the week, but I must say, it’s all positive at this point. As I write, the novel has peaked at #13 in the overall Best Sellers (Free) List.

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It’s at #1 in the contemporary romance:

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#2 in historical fiction. (And yes, it actually fits in both of those categories. Read it and find out why.)

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Thanks for your support!

 

 

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A Valentine’s Day Exclusive: “Banyan Tree” Romantic Excerpt

My latest novel, The Reach of the Banyan Tree, is loosely a historical romance. I hate to categorize it as such because I don’t believe it adequately describes it. But, it does have romance and it does tell a historical story. I thought I’d share a short romantic excerpt in honor of Valentine’s Day 2015. In the scene below, Charles Regal Carson finds a little unexpected love in the midst of chaos in the quiet, remote countryside of French Indochina – July 1945. Enjoy.

***

Charles paused for a moment, and then all was revealed to him. He understood her hesitation and her apprehension. He understood the worried look on her face and her comments about betrayal. The irony of the last two days finally came to light—that love could appear out of the muddy struggle for life in the countryside of Vietnam. He put his right hand in her hair and slightly pulled away, allowing the hair to cascade back down to her head. She closed her eyes and turned her head into his touch. Protocol and procedures were hundreds of miles away in the sleepy camp of Tan Trao. But on this night, on this patch of ground, Charles felt the urgings of his heart like never before. Death seemed a lifetime away, as did Dinh-Hoa and the rifles. He had never met anyone like Mai, and whatever tomorrow would bring, he knew they at least had this moment.

He leaned in towards her, and their lips met for the first time. Mai didn’t think of her husband or Vinh or the revolution; she thought only of the love and respect she had for Charles Regal Carson. Charles pulled her close, picking her petite frame off the ground, slowly caressing her back as they kissed.

There is comfort in shared experience, in the touch of a woman, in the arms of a respectable man. They pushed off the troubles of tomorrow, letting the dawn worry about the future.

Purchase The Reach of the Banyan Tree HERE!

New “Banyan Tree” Review: “Excellent Story, Beautifully Written”

Cathy from Cath’n’ Kindle Book Review recently posted her review of my latest novel, “The Reach of the Banyan Tree.”

She starts off by saying this:

“Mark Sasse never disappoints. He writes with heart and soul and sucks you right into his characters’ world…wherever and whenever it is.”

And ends by saying this:

“It’s an excellent story, beautifully written, quite possibly his best book yet. Highly recommended.”

She says a lot of wonderful things in the middle of those two quotes. Please head on over to her website and check out the entire review. And if it moves you to check out a good read, well I’d be honored to have you read it. Much appreciated!

Read the entire review: HERE!

Win a $200 Amazon Gift Card for Valentine’s Day!

Hey all,

I’ve once again partnered with The Kindle Book Review so you have a chance of winning a great gift card from Amazon – enough to do a good deal of damage!

Plus, it’s a great opportunity to help promote my latest novel, The Reach of the Banyan Tree.  

Here it is. Click HERE to enter the giveaway and, hopefully, enjoy a great read. Thanks everyone.

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A New Review – Some Author Comparisons – Some Reasons to Read “Banyan Tree”

Author, blogger, book reviewer – Eileen Granfors – gives a wonderful new book review of my latest, The Reach of the Banyan Tree. She also dropped some author names whom she used as a comparison. I am, of course, humbled by her kind words. She also coaxed out of me a list of 10 books which have inspired me. It’s all on her blog. The opening section of her review is here, but do head on over and read it in its entirety. And if you haven’t checked out “Banyan Tree” yet, I’d be honored. Enjoy.

“Historical fiction is my favorite genre, and Mark Sasse has joined my list of must-read authors in the genre. I would compare his work to that of both James Clavell and John Shors.

Sasse’s plots are intricate, as they should be in historical fiction. The story takes us through several generations, with the concomitant sociological-political-historical details of the time. This alone might suffice to satisfy my curiosity about eras of world history. But Sasse, as an observant writer, also develops setting and character and plot twists.”

Read the entire review HERE!

New Excerpt from “The Reach of the Banyan Tree”

In this excerpt, the small teen, Long, who is large in spirit and hatred for the French colonialists, insists on trying to shoot a rifle and almost ends up shooting an Allied plane. Setting: Tan Trao – Tonkin, French Indochina – July 16, 1945. Enjoy.

“Can I try?”

“We don’t allow skinny school boys to shoot,” said one of the gruff soldiers.

“I’m not a school boy.”

“Well, you should be.”

“I wouldn’t go to a French school if you paid me,” snapped the precocious teen.

“Well that’s good because there aren’t any French schools around here, and I wouldn’t pay you to wipe my boots. What are you? Eight?”

“I’m fourteen, and my uncle says I can join the revolution in eight months.”

“I didn’t know they were allowing babies into the army now,” another soldier jested with him.

“I’m not a baby.”

“You could have fooled me. You have to be taller than a rifle to actually shoot a rifle.”

The gaunt, malnourished, height-challenged youngster scoffed at those petty remarks. He may have been small, but he had the spirit of a warrior who wanted nothing more than to help the revolution. His uncle had taught him a hatred for the French that bred easily amongst the weary-laden souls living in a war-torn colony that had suffocated under eighty years of the foreigners trying to squeeze blood from their Asian turnip. The French, somehow, found a steady stream of income where there was no money or resources, with only the raw-boned determination of the Vietnamese peasants willing to work all day for a bowl of rice gruel. The abuse was all well documented—the rubber plantations that used corvee labor in near slave-like conditions to produce the sap to profit the large French corporations. The French imposed a quota on alcohol that each village was required to purchase whether they wanted it or not and whether it took away from their necessary grain purchases. They opened opium dens, addicting large portions of the male population while forbidding the sale of opiates of any kind in France itself. They purposefully kept the education system unattainable for the vast majority of the population, giving a French education to just enough Annamese to fill the necessary low-level administration posts in order to serve the colony and the French Empire.

“Come on. Let me try one.”

“Go ahead. Teach him a lesson,” said one of the soldiers.

“All right. Here you go.”

He put the outdated French relic on his shoulder and pointed it down-field towards a broken wooden crate with an “x” painted across it.

“Watch this,” said the cocky young man.

His eye lined up along the barrel and pulled the trigger hard but nothing happened.

“You have to pull it back further.”

“I know,” said Long.

“You know about as much as my ox.”

He flinched once and pulled back with his finger as hard as he could. The barrel went flying upward and the shot rang out into the heavens as Long blew back onto the ground.

“What are you shooting at?”

“Must be that plane there,” chimed in another soldier.

On the horizon, the rolling hum of a C-47 pierced the sky.

“Idiot! That’s a friendly plane. It’s the Americans.”

Long hoped that the trajectory of the bullet didn’t find its way into the path of the Allied plane. As he watched it get closer, shouting could be heard in the camp.

“They’re coming! They’re coming!”

“Slim. You better hurry or you’re going to miss it!” yelled Long.

You can pick up a copy of The Reach of the Banyan Tree HERE!

Kindle $2.99  Paperback: $10.79

 

1 Day Left – “The Reach of the Banyan Tree” @ 99 cents

Last chance to pick up a great read at a super great price. After Dec 8th, the Kindle price will re-settle back in at its normal $2.99.

If you like any of the following genres, you should give it a try. It’s a true mix of:

  • historical fiction
  • contemporary romance
  • contemporary fiction
  • love story
  • war and adventure
  • cross-cultural
  • literary fiction

Definitely a little something for everyone. Its story spans from 1945 Indochina at the tail end of WWII the whole way up to modern day.

I hope you enjoy.

Mark

Oh yeah, its in print, too.

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