Now Available: A MAN TOO OLD FOR A PLACE TOO FAR

And the trilogy begins …

Paperback $14.99 HERE! Prime Shipping before Christmas!

Kindle eBook  HERE! New Release special only 99 cents until Jan 1

Kindle in pre-order. Releases directly to your Kindle device on December 18.

Amazon UK: HERE!

Amazon Canada: HERE!

Amazon Australia: HERE!

I’m very fond of this book. And it’s just the beginning. Book 2 is only months away as the saga continues. It’s fun, it’s explosive, it’s unexpected, it’s a page-turner.

This novel has been two years in the making and I’m thrilled with the result. I hope you’ll check it out. The Kindle version deal is a STEAL!

Thanks for the support.

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Writers: You Can Only Control the Process, Not the Results

Every writer wants to sell more books.

Every writer wants to find more readers.

But if you are writing for the purpose of results, you’ll be frequently disappointed in this cut-throat, highly-competitive business.  The faster you realize that, as a writer, the only thing you control is the process, the faster you’ll be at peace with the results – whether good or bad.

I figured this out long ago. I began novel-writing and play-writing because I couldn’t contain the creativity that started bubbling over in my brain. It became my release and eventually my passion. When I eventually decided to start putting my works out in the public eye, I received a rude awakening – not because the results were bad, no, because the results were good.

My first novel started to sell some. Then reviews started coming in, positive reviews, and before I knew it my first novel had racked-up 80+ reviews on Amazon. I was floored and even thought quietly to myself that this isn’t so hard after all.

Ha. That’s when my rude awakening began to seep in. I suppose it was more gradual than rude, but it was certainly real nonetheless. Book two, for some reason, seemed more difficult to market. Then the rules changed at Amazon, and certain big promotion sites changed the way they did business. Everything got more competitive, and before I knew it, I had no idea how to sell books anymore.

Well, it turns out that I didn’t know in the first place. When I think back upon it, I have no idea how my first book did so well in getting reviews. Am I doing anything different now? Yes, actually. I’m better at marketing now. I work harder now. And has it led to more results?

Not really.

So what’s the deal? For me, the deal is that I don’t know how to sell books. But who cares!

Not me. I know what I can control and that’s my writing process.

So I ask myself these questions:

Am I writing the stories I want to tell?

Am I putting the proper time into revisions: 2nd, 3rd, 4th drafts?

Am I meticulous in the editing process?

Do I have an editor helping me improve my book?

Have I recruited beta readers to give me early feedback?

Am I purposeful when thinking about cover design and book layout?

Do I put time and effort into recruiting reviewers who will post honest reviews?

Do I market with variety in mind?

Am I trying new marketing avenues?

Am I adjusting to new trends and reading up on new developments?

Am I reading other blogs to get feedback about process and the book industry in general?

Am I striving to be better?

If I can answer “yes” to every one of those questions above, then I simply do not care about results because I can’t control them anyways.

I can, however, control the process. If I can look back without regrets and say that I’ve written the book I wanted to write and I marketed it in the absolute best way I know how, then I think it’s safe to say that I have successfully fulfilled the requirement of my passion for writing.

How about you? Are you concerned with results or process?

Commit to Your Creativity

There’s a lot of creative people out there hiding behind your non-commitment.

Creativity can be frightening. I get that. When one allows their creative works to be known to others, it can feel like a smack in the face if you hear a rude comment or a flippant laugh.

I work with a lot of students who are afraid to step out and try the unknown. Sometimes, if they let me read their play or their poem, a verbal addendum of apologies and clarifications as long as the train of a Queen’s gown is attached to it in order to down-play their work and lower expectations.

Again, I understand why. Creative artists are fragile beasts.

But if you want to improve, and if you want to move forward in your craft, I am convinced you have to commit to your creativity and just let it fly.

I dealt with an example of this today. I’m working on the ending of my upcoming show, and the final segment of the show is a narrative piece which is set to music. I’ve been toying all week with wanting to add a narrative introduction to the narrative piece as a way of setting the tone and keeping the audience’s attention.

After a couple days of brainstorming which yielded no fruit, I went back to my script and started pulling out phrases. Then I started playing the intro music and trying out different voices to see what I liked.

And then it hit me. My idea is rather weird. I think my actors are going to look at me as if I’m insane if I asked them to do this. I started second-guessing myself until I put my foot down and said, “No, this is my idea and I’m sticking with it.”

I’ve learned over the years to trust my instincts and go for it.

Now is my idea really clever? Or is it actually stupid? I have no clue.

But the point is, who cares? It’s the creative idea that I currently have, and in lieu of a better one, I’m committed to it.

And that’s how creativity should work. Push your idea, try, mold, change, adapt, but in the end, let it fly, whatever it is and don’t apologize for it – even if someone chuckles at how silly they thought it was.

Trust yourself, and commit to your creativity. It might actually be better than you think.

 

Ending Dec 1: My Kindle Scout Campaign. I could use your help!

My Kindle Scout campaign for book one of my brand new trilogy ends on December 1. If you haven’t nominated it yet, please head over to the site and give it a look.

If you like what you see, I’d be honored to receive your nomination which will bring me one step closer to a publishing deal with Amazon. It costs you nothing, but if the campaign succeeds, you’ll receive a early-release copy of the novel.

Thanks for your support. Kindle Scout Campaign Here!

Still using paperbacks? Here’s the artwork for my new one.

Do indie authors still do paperback versions? I’m sure many do, and I’m one of them. The paperback versions are great for many reasons:

  1. They feel so good in your hands! You work is an actual thing – not just some pixels on a screen. Even if it’s only for the author himself, it’s worth it to get a paperback.
  2. Many reviewers still prefer to hold an actual book in their hands. When you have a paperback, you can place it in their hands. Yes, it costs money, but the return can be worth it.
  3. Paperbacks are great for selling at readings or other meet-and-greet type events. They’re essential, I would argue, for this purpose.
  4. Hey, face it, your friends and family love the paperbacks too!
  5. They are not that difficult to make. If you are even a little savvy with the computer, you can put together your own paperback through Createspace or other company in a snap. Or you can pay someone to do it for you.

For me, making paperbacks available is still a useful strategy for book marketing.

Here’s the artwork for my latest. Thoughts?

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A New Trilogy: Coming Soon!

I used to think I would never write a series or a trilogy. I liked closure. I liked an entire world or experience to be contained in one complete story. I hated cliff-hangers. (Marvel movies, really? Those after credit snippets were clever marketing ploys.) I hated marketing ploys. So I wrote five standalone novels. I was satisfied.

Then I started writing my sixth novel. It was different on many levels, but I still thought it would be a standalone novel until I finished it. Suddenly I had a strange feeling: it didn’t feel finished. There was more to tell. More to discover. I realized at that moment that I had never written a sequel or series because I had previously not had the right story.

Now I do, and I’m proud to soon be releasing book one of The Forgotten Child Trilogy: A Man Too Old for a Place Too Far.

It’s on Kindle Scout until the December 1. It could use your nomination. Please use this KINDLE SCOUT LINK and read the first couple chapters of it. And if you like it, please nominate it!

REVIEWERS: If you review books and post reviews on Amazon and Goodreads, I’d love to send you a pre-release copy of book 1 in exchange for your honest review. Email me at mark@mwsasse.com to set it up.

Here are the tentative release dates for THE FORGOTTEN CHILD TRILOGY. I can’t wait.

BOOK 1 – DECEMBER 2017 – A MAN TOO OLD FOR A PLACE TOO FAR

BOOK 2 – SUMMER 2018 – THE AFRICAN CONNECTION

BOOK 3 – TBD – THE FORGOTTEN CHILD

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I need your help! Nominate my novel on Kindle Scout!

Book One of my soon to be released trilogy – A Man Too Old for a Place Too Far – is currently on Kindle Scout, vying for a Kindle Press publishing deal.

You can help! Please check out the Kindle Scout page for my novel. If you like what you read, nominate it. It helps get the attention of the Kindle Press editors. If my book is chosen, then you’ll be one of the first to receive a copy of it for FREE!

You have nothing to lose, but I do have something to gain. I greatly appreciate your help!

The campaign link is HERE!

Here’s the book’s blurb and cover.

Thanks for your support.

If she wanted help changing the world for one forgotten child, she chose the wrong man. Seventy-two-year-old Francis Frick would scorn his own family to close another deal. But Bee doesn’t see the world like you or me. She is an optimist, searching for potential where none exists, and so she hovers above Frick’s bed every night, eating pomegranates and waiting for his eyes to open to the possibilities. One night, it finally happens. A rogue droplet of juice slips through her fingers and hits the sleeping Manhattan businessman on the forehead, thrusting him on a series of baffling adventures to some of the twentieth century’s most brutal regimes—all to help Bee save a forgotten child of history.

A Man Too Old for a Place Too Far is part one of The Forgotten Child Trilogy—a one-of-a-kind adventure that mixes time travel, magical realism, and historical fiction into a contemporary story about an old man, his estranged daughter, and a tiny flying person in a white robe, who chooses to believe that anything can happen with enough prodding and an endless supply of pomegranates.

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